References

     
 


We have just begun to search the literature and compile references and web pages of scientists who have used our products.  Where possible we have included a hyperlink to a PDF file, an e-journal or a web page protocol.  Some times that hyperlink may take you directly to the article or just to the Journal's homepage depending upon the Journal's access policy.

 

This list is by no means exhaustive as we have sold over 3300 of the Replicators and also have sold hundreds of  the same replicators through Nalge Nunc and their distributors.  Finding e-journals that permit a full text search and having authors who print an acknowledgement of our Replicators in the Materials & Methods has been a difficult task.  We hope you find the following references on our products helpful.

     
 
Blotting Arrays On Membrane Inoculating Arrays On Agar
Plates
Glass Slide Microarrayers

Slot Pin Replicators
 
Replicating Libraries Initiating PCR Reactions
Colony Picking Mixing In Deep Well Plates Mixing In Microplates
Keeping Particulates In Suspension HTS Applications Aspiration And Dispensing Manifolds
Madge Gel Loading Deposition Of Proteins Wounding Tissue Culture Monolayers
Forensic Applications Dispensing Solids / Powders  
 


  References By Application

     


A. Blotting Arrays On Membrane

     
 


The first  reference is from Leroy Hood's Lab on the precursor for our Vicki Registration High Density Array Replicator System 

  1. M. Schummer, W.L. Ng, P.S. Nelson, R.B. Bumgarner and L. Hood. (1997)  Inexpensive Handheld Device for the Construction of High-Density Nucleic Acid Arrays, ("arraying and replicating device" or (ARD), Biotechniques 23: 1087-1092  http://chroma.mbt.washington.edu/ARD/
    (pdf)


  2. R.A. Prade, J. Griffith, K. Kochut, J. Arnold, and W. E. Timberlake. (1997)  In vitro reconstruction of the Aspergillus (= Emericella) nidulans genome. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:14564-14569.
    (pdf)


  3. Qing Yue, Joanna C. Jen, Stanley F. Nelson, and Robert W. Baloh.  (1997) Progressive Ataxia Due to a Missense Mutation in a Calcium-Channel Gene, Am. J. Hum. Genet., 61:1078-1087. 
    (pdf)


  4. James P. Connell, Sujata Pammi, Muhammad J. Iqbal, Tim Huizinga and Avutu S. Reddy.  (1998) A High Through-put Procedure for Capturing Microsatellites from Complex Plant Genomes, Plant Molecular Biology Reporter 16: 341–349.
    (pdf)

  5. M. Schummer, W.L. Ng, P.S. Nelson, R.B. Bumgarner and L. Hood. (1999) Inexpensive Handheld Device for the Construction of High-Density Nucleic Acid Arrays, in Expression Genetics: Accelerated and High-Throughput Methods, ed. M. McClelland and A. Pardee, BioTechiques Books, Natick, MA. 1999, p. 3-11.

  6. D.C. Sgroi, S. Teng, G. Robinson, R. LeVangie, J.R. Hudson, Jr, and A.G. Elkahloun. (1999)  In vivo gene expression profile analysis of human breast cancer progression. Cancer Research, Nov 15, 59(22) 5656-61.
    (pdf)

  7. J. Jen, Q. Yue, S.F. Nelson, H. Yu, M. Litt, J. Nutt and R.W. Baloh.  (1999) A novel nonsense mutation in CACNA1A causes episodic ataxia and hemiplegia, Neurology, 53: Number 1 July 13, 1999.

  8. Jürg Enkerli, Heather Reed, Angela Briley, Garima Bhatt, and Sarah,  F. Covert.  (2000) Physical Map of a Conditionally Dispensable Chromosome in Nectria haematococca Mating Population VI and Location of Chromosome, Genetics, Vol. 155, 1083-1094.  Hyperlink to e-journal   Note, you have to be an on line subscriber to Genetics to access the article through this link.
    (pdf)

  9. Wade A. Bresnahan, Thomas Shenk.  (2000) A Subset of Viral Transcripts Packaged Within Human Cytomegalovirus Particles,  Science Volume 288, Number 5475, Issue of 30 Jun 2000, pp. 2373-2376. 
     

  10. Jurg Enkerli, Heather Reed, Angela Briley, Garima Bhatt and Sarah F. Covert.  (2000)  Physical Map of a Conditionally Dispensable Chromosome in Nectria haematococca Mating Population VI and Location of Chromosome Breakpoints.  Genetics, Vol. 155, 1083-1094, July 2000
    (pdf)

  11. Rubina S. Ismail, Rae Lynn Baldwin, Junguo Fang, Damaris Browning, Beth Y. Karlan, Judith C. Gasson and David D. Chang.  (2000)  Differential Gene Expression between Normal and Tumor-derived Ovarian Epithelial Cells.  Cancer Research 60, 6744-6749, December 1, 2000
    (pdf)

  12. Jay D. Evans and Diana E. Wheeler.  (2000) Expression profiles during honeybee caste determination.  GenomeBiology December 20, 2000
    (pdf)

  13. J. Felix, R. D. Duarte, R. A. Jorge, P. Arruda and M. Menossi.  (2001) Using macroarrays containing sugarcane ESTs to identify aluminium induced genes in maize, W. J. Horst et al.(Eds.), Plant nutrition – Food security and sustainability of agro-ecosystems. 40~41
    (pdf)

  14. Detailed Macroarray Hybrization procedure by the above group.
    (pdf)

  15. Andrei V. Tkatchenko, Richard P. Visconti, Liguan Shang, Thomas Papenbrock, Nathanael D. Pruett, Tatsuya Ito, Makio Ogawa and Alexander Awgulewitsch.  (2001) Overexpression of Hosc13 in differentiating keratinocytes results in downregulation of a novel hair keratin gene cluster and alopecia.  Development 128, 1547-1558
    (pdf)

  16. Marta Matvienko, Manuel J. Torres, and John I. Yoder.  (2001) Transcriptional Responses in the Hemiparasitic Plant Triphysaria versicolor to Host Plant Signals.  Plant Physiology September 2001; 127(1):272-282
    (pdf)

  17. Clontech Laboratories, Inc.  (2001)  PCR-Select Differential Screening Kit User Manual.  September 10, 2001
    (pdf)

  18. Yi-Hong Wang, David F. Garvin and Leon V. Kochian.  (2001) Nitrate-Induced Genes in Tomato Roots.  Array Analysis Revels Novel Genes that may Play a Role in Nitrogen Nutrition.  Plant Physiology September 2001; 127(1):345-359
    (pdf)

  19. Lea Valensky, Gianluca Della Vedova, Alexandra J. Scupham, Sam Alvey, Andres Figueroa, Bei Yin, R. Jack Hartin, Marek Chrobak, David E. Crowley, Tao Jiang and James Borneman.  (2002) Analysis of Bacterial Community Composition by Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting of rRNA Genes,  Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 68, no 7 pp3243-3250
    (pdf)

  20. Natalya Bodyak, Peter M. Kang, Makoto Hiromura, Indra Sulijoadikusumo, Nobuo Horikoshi, Konstantin Khrapko and Anny Usheva.  (2002)  Gene expression profiling of the again mouse cardiac myocytes.  Oxford University Press.  Nucleic Acids Research 2002, Vol. 30, No. 17 3788-3794
    (pdf)

  21. Pavel Tomancak, Amy Beaton, Richard Eiszmann, Elaine Kwan, Shengqiang Shu, Suzanna E. Lewis, Stephen Richards, Michael Ashburner, Volker Hartenstein, Susan E. Celniker, and Gerald M. Rubin.  (2002)  Systematic Determination Of Patterns Of Gene Expression During Drosophila Embryogenesis.  GenomeBiology December 23, 2002
    (pdf)

  22. J.E.K. Cooke, K.A. Brown, R. Wu and J.M. Davis.  (2003) Gene expression associated with N-induced shifts in resource allocation in poplar.  Blackwell Synergy, Plant, Cell & Environment, Vol 26, Issue 5, Page 757.  May 2003
    (pdf)

  23. Protocol on Dr. Brian Fristensky's web site at the University of Manitoba,describing DNA dot blotting using a Multi-Blot Replicator.
    (pdf)

  24. Lea Valinsky, Alexandra J. Scupham, Gianluca Della Vedova, Zheng Liu, Andres Figueroa, Kate Jampachaisri, James Press, Tao Jiang, and James Borneman.  Oligonucleotide Fingerprinting of Ribosomal RNA Genes (OFRG)  UC Riverside Macroarray Protocol document.
    (pdf)

  25. USDA - ARS Root Disease and Biological Control Research Unit - Thomashow Group, P.fluorescens Protocol for ordered Q8r1-96 genomic library.
    (pdf)

  26. Internet Posting.  Tomashow group.  USDA-ARS Root Disease and Biological Control Research Unit

  27. Internet Posting.  German

  28. Juliana de Maria Felix, Rodrigo Duarte Drummond, Fabio Tebaldi Silveira Walnut, Vicente Eugenio de Rosa Junior, Renato Atilio Jorge, Pablo Arruda, Marcelo Menossi.  Use of arrangements of DNA in nylon for the analysis of the genica expression in wide scale research.  Bio Tecnologia



  29. Jessica E. Hutti, Emily T. Jarrell, James D. Chang, Derek W. Abbott, Peter Storz, Alex Toker, Lewis C. Cantley and Benjamin E. Turk.  A Rapid Method for Determining Protein Kinase Phosphorylantion Specificity.  Nature Methods Vol 1, No. 1 October 2004 P 27-29
    (pdf)

  30. Jessica E. Hutti, et al. Supplemental information (methods).
    (pdf)
     

  31. M.J. Lehane, S. Aksoy, W. Bigson, A. Kerhornou, M. Berriman, J. Hamilton, M.B. Soares, M.F. Bonaldo, S. Lehane, and N. Hall.  (2003)  Adult midgut expressed sequence tags from the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans and expression analysis of putative immune response genes.  Genome Biology, 2003, 4:R63.
    (pdf)
     

  32. A. Fessehaie, S.H. De Boer, and C.A. Levesque.  (2002)  An Oligonucleotide Array for the Identification and Differentiation of Bacteria Pathogenic on Potato.  Phytopathology 93: p. 262-269.
    (pdf)
     

  33. M.M. Nagarajan, S.H. De Boer.  (2003).  An Oligonucledotide Array to Detect Genetically Modified Events in Potato.  Plant Molecular Biology Reporter.  September 2003, 21: p. 259-270.
    (pdf)
     

  34. P.S. Yan, M.R. Perry, D.E. Laux, A.L. Asare, C.W. Caldwell, and T.H. Huang.  (2000)  CpG Island Arrays: An Application toward Deciphering Epigenetic Signatures, Clinical Cancer Research, April 2000, Vol. 6: p. 1432-1438.
    (pdf)
     

  35. B.D. Jenkins, G.F. Steward, S.M. Short, B.B. Ward, and J.P. Zehr.  (2004)  Fingerprinting Diazotroph Communities in the Chesapeak Baby by Using a DNS Macroarray.  Applied and Environmental Microbiology, p. 1767-1776.
    (pdf)
     

  36. Martin Herd and Christine Kocks.  (2001)  Gene Fragments Distinguishing an Epidemic-Associated Strain from a Virulent Prototype Strain of Listeria monocytogenes Belongs to a Distinct Functional Subset of Genes and Partially Cross-Hybridize with Other Listeria Species.  Infection and Immunity.  2001, Vol. 69, No. 6, p. 3972-3979.
    (pdf)
     

  37. T. Erickson, B.D. Maciejko, C. Gee, V. Lam, D. Ng, A. Blanchard, Y. Myal, M.A. Chrenek, and P. Wong.  (2004)  Identification of Mammary Gland Involution Differentially Expressed Genes in Breast Cancer Tissues. Transaction of the Integrated Biomedical Informatics & Enabling Technologies Symposium Journal, 2004, 1: p. 1-14.
    (pdf)
     

  38. G.S. Pullman, S. Johnson, G. Peter, J.Cairney, and N. Xu.  (2003)  Improving loblolly pine somatic embryo maturation: comparison of somatic and zygotic embryo morphology, germination, and gene expression.  Plant Cell Rep, 21: p. 747-758.
    (pdf)
     

  39. L. Tapia, M. Gonzalez-Aguero, M.F. Cisternas, M. Sauzo, V. Cambizo, R. Uauy, and M. Gonzalez.  (2004)  Metallothionein is crucial for safe intracellular copper storage and cell survival at normal and supra-physiological exposure levels. Biochem, June 2004, p. 378, 617-624.
    (pdf)
     

  40. B.L. Hood, M.M. Darfler, T.G. Gueiel, B. Furusato, D.A. Lucas, B.R. Ringeisen, I.A. Sesterhenn, T.P. Conrads, T.D. Veenstra, and D.B. Krizman.  (2005)  Proteomic Analysis of Formalin-fixed Prostate Cancer Tissue.  Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 4: p. 1741-1753.
    (pdf)
     

  41. Sung H. Lim, Christopher J. Musto, Erwin Park, Wenxuan Zhong, and Kenneth S. Suslick. (2008) A Colorimetric Sensor Array for Detection and Identification of Sugars. ORGANIC LETTERS 2008 Vol. 10, No. 20 p. 4405-4408.
    (pdf)
     

  42. Jin Ho Bang, Sung H. Lim, Erwin Park, and Kenneth S. Suslick. (2008) Chemically Responsive Nanoporous Pigments: Colorimetric Sensor Arrays and the Identification of Aliphatic Amines. Langmuir 2008, 24, 13168-13172.
    (pdf)
     

  43. Sung H. Lim, Liang Feng, Jonathan W. Kemling, Christopher J. Musto and Kenneth S. Suslick. (2009) An Optoelectronic Nose for the Detection of Toxic Gases. Nature Chemistry Vol. 1, October 2009, p. 562-567.
    (pdf)
     

     
 


B. Inoculating Arrays On Agar Plates

     
 
  1. The Sacchromyces Genome Deletion Project, uses our pin tools to inoculate yeast onto agar plates.  The hyperlink will take you to the protocol where that procedure is described.
    (pdf)

  2. The DeRisi Lab at UCSF internet posting of protocol to inoculate yeast onto agar plates with V&P replicators.
    (pdf)

  3. Internet Posting.  Boone Lab.  University of Toronto
    (pdf)

  4. Internet Posting.  Sackler.  SGA Analysis:
    (pdf)
     

  5. L. Patrone, S.E. Henson, J. Teodrovic, C.S. Malone, S.W. French, R. Wall, and M.A. Teitell.  (2003)  Gene expression patterns in AIDS versus non-AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.  Experimental and Molecular Pathology 74, 2003, p. 129-139.
    (pdf)

     


C. Glass Slide Microarrayers

     
 
  1. Heng Hsu and Michael Snyder.  (2001)  Biochemical Assays in a Chip Format, in www.CurrentDrugDiscover.com Feature article September 2001
    (pdf)

  2. Anuj Kumar, Paul M. Harrison, Kei-Hoi Cheung, Ning Lan, Nathaniel Echols, Paul Bertone, Perry Miller, Mark B. Gerstein and Michael Snyder.  (2002) An Integrated Approach for finding Overlooked Genes in Yeast.  Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 20, January pp 58-63
    (pdf)
     

  3. German Human Genome Project posted on the internet.  They used the Glass Slide Arrayer that we OEM to Schleicher & Schuell.

  4. BioChain uses our Glass Slide arrayer to detect Protein arrays, Tumor Tissue arrays and Tumor mRNA arrays.  Photos of these arrays are posted on their web site.

  5. Internet Posting.  Michel Schummer,  Entwickler DeRisi
     
  6. Seong, Yong.  (2002)  Microimmunoassay Using a Protein Chip:  Optimizing Conditions for Protein Immbolization.  Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, July 2002, p. 927-930.
    (pdf)

     


D. Slot Pin Replicators

     
 
  1. HALO384: A Halo-Based Potency Prediction Algorithm for High-Throughput Detection of Antimicrobial Agents Woehrmann, Marcos H.; Gassner, Nadine C.; Bray, Walter M.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Lokey, Scott Journal of Biomolecular Screening, Volume 15, issue 2 (February 2010), p. 196-205.

  2. Y. Blat, and N. Kleckner.  (1999) Cohesins Bind to Prefential Sites along Yeast Chromosome III, with Differential Regulation along Arms Versus the Centric Region. Cell, Vol. 98, pp 249-259.
    (pdf)

  3. J. Herich.  (2001) A Cost-Effective Way to Pipet 384 Samples Simultaneously Presented at the San Diego Chapter of the LRIG 9/26/2001

  4. J. Herich. (2002) The Use Of 384 Pin Tool Devices, A Cost-Effective Way To Run Cell-Based Assays.
    High Throughput Screening for Drug Discovery, Marcus Evans Conferences 16-18 July 2002 Location: Hilton Back Bay- Boston, USA

  5. V. Amann.  Vanderbilt  University Microarray Shared Resource facility, Internet protocol posting using V&P slot pin replicators to inoculate cultures.
    (pdf)
     

  6. Judelson, Howard S.  (2002)  Sequence Variation and Genomic Amplification of a Family of Gypsy-like Elements in the Oomycete Genus Phytophthora.  Evolution of a Retroelement Family in Phytophthora, 2002, p. 1313-1322.
    (pdf)
     

  7. J. Nat. Prod. (2007), Accelerating the Discovery of Biologically Active Small Molecules Using a High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay. 70, 383-390
    (pdf)

  8. J.T. Bradshaw PhD, D. Chau, P. Cleveland PhD. (2011), Nanoliter Volume Pin Tool Transfers as Measured by a Dual-Dye Absorbance Method.
    (pdf)

     


E. Manual Liquid Transfer (Replicating Genomic Libraries)

 
 
  1. Shao-bing Hua, Ying Luo, Mengsheng Qiu, Eva Chan, Helen Zhou and Li Zhu.  (1998) Construction of a modular yeast two-hybrid cDNA library from human EST clones for the human genome protein linkage map Gene, Volume 215, Issue 1, 17 July, Pages 143-152. 


  2. Brent R. Stockwell, Stephen J. Haggarty and Stuart L. Schreiber.  (1999) High-throughput screening of small molecules in miniaturized mammalian cell-based assays involving post-translational modifications. Chemistry & Biology 19, Vol. 6: 71-83.  Hyperlink to e-journal.
    (pdf)

  3. Rubina S. Ismail, Rae Lynn Baldwin, Junguo Fang, Damaris Browning, Beth Y. Karlan, Judith C. Gasson and David D. Chang.  (2000)  Differential Gene Expression between Normal and Tumor-derived Ovarian Epithelial Cells.  Cancer Research 60, 6744-6749, December 1, 2000
    (pdf)

  4. B. Stirling, G. Newcombe, J. Vrebalov, I. Bosdet and H.D. Bradshaw, Jr.  (2001) Suppressed recombination around the MXC3 locus, a major gene for resistance to poplar leaf rust. Theor Appl Genet (2001) 103:1129–1137 © Springer-Verlag
    (pdf)
     
  5. Internet Posting.  Ee-Been Goh, Grace Yim, Wayne Tsui, JoAnn McClure, Michael G. Surette and Julian Davies.  (2002)  Transcriptional Modulation of bacterial gene expression by subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics.  December 24, 2002
    (pdf)

  6. Scott Tarpinian and George Halley.  (2003) Eppendorf Perfectprep BAC 96: A high Throughput purification system for obtaining high quality BAC DNA.  2003 Eppendorf Protocol posted on Internet.
    (pdf)
     
  7. Scott Tarpinian.  (2003) Purification of Fosmids and  PAC's using Eppendorf Perfectprep BAC 96 kit,  2003 Eppendorf Protocol posted on Internet.
    (pdf)

  8. Dr. Kevin White's Drosophila DNA Microarray Homepage at the Stanford University School of Medicine.  Using Replicators to transfer cDNA EST clones to a PCR reaction plate.

  9. NIH Microarray Project Protocols posted on the internet.
    (pdf)

  10. Internet posting of Pin Tool Protocol for  Isolation of Plasmids for HTP Sequencing Protocol used by the Schnable Laboratory (Iowa State University) based to a large extent on one obtained from Rod Wing’s group at Clemson University. Please contact Dr. TJ Wen, tjwen@iastate.edu regarding questions or corrections.
    (pdf) 

  11. Vicky Amann.  PCR Amplification Protocol for the NIA 15K set.  Vanderbilt Microarray Shared Resource
    (pdf)
     

  12. O. Novac, A. Guenier, and J. Pelletier.  (2004)  Inhibitors of protein synthesis identified by a high throughput multiplexed translation screen.  Nucleic Acids Research, 2004, Vol. 32, No. 3, p. 902-915.
    (pdf)

     


F. Robot Liquid Transfer (HTS Applications)

     
 
  1. Pavel Rychetsky, Martha Ackerman and Patti Willson. (2001)  Conversion of Manual Access of 384 Lidded Plates to an Automated Storage and Retrieval System.  MipTec ICAR Basel, June 20, 2001.
    (pdf)

  2. J. Herich.  (2001) A Cost-Effective Way to Pipet 384 Samples Simultaneously Presented at the San Diego Chapter of the LRIG 9/26/2001

  3. Internet Posting.  Richard Y.T. Kao, Jeremy L. Jenkins, Karen A. Olson, Marc E. Key, James W. Fett and Robert Shapiro.  (2002) A small-molecule inhibitor of the ribonucleolytic activity of human angiogenin that possesses antitumor activity.  July 23, 2002
    (pdf)

  4. J. Herich.  (2002) The Use Of 384 Pin Tool Devices, A Cost-Effective Way To Run Cell-Based Assays.
    High Throughput Screening for Drug Discovery, Marcus Evans Conferences 16-18 July 2002 Location: Hilton Back Bay- Boston, USA

  5. John Herich.  (2002) Upgrading disposable tip 96 channel pipetting devices to 384 pin tool pipetting devices, a cost-effective way to pipet 384 samples simultaneously.  Lab Automation 2002, Palm Springs Presentation, January 27. E-mail:jherich@maxim.com

    Abstract

    To upgrade from a 96 well format to a 384 well format can be a difficult process for many high throughput screening (HTS) labs. Many of the older 96 channel pipetting devices cannot be upgraded to handle 384 well pipetting. In addition, the cost of the disposable pipet tip is very high for most of the newer 384 channel pipetting devices. The use of 384 pin tools can provide a very cost-effective solution for many HTS needs. We have found that the pin tools can transfer small volumes in a robust and reproducible manner suitable for HTS.

  6. Patricia J. Koutz.  (2002) Dynamic delivery of nanoliter volumes with a pin tool. Lab Automation 2002, Palm Springs Presentation, January 27. E-mail:pkoutz@vp-scientific.com

    Abstract

    We present data here showing better than 10% CV (accuracy) of delivery over a range of volumes from 4 nl to 217 nl with solid pins by changing either pin diameter or speed of withdrawal from the source liquid or both. In most cases the CV's were between 3 and 5%. Increasing speed of pin withdrawal by 9 fold resulted in ~3 fold increase in volume delivered by all three pin diameters tested (.229 mm, .457 mm and .787 mm). Taking advantage of this phenomenon, the operator can dynamically adjust the delivery volumes on pin tools and still maintain good CV's by simply adjusting the withdrawal speed. These pin tools can be mounted on a variety of liquid handling robots, regardless of the pipettor head. For example, a 1536-pin tool can be adapted onto a 96-channel pipettor robot or a 96-pin tool can be fitted onto a 384-channel robot. This can be a useful way to bring out-of-date equipment back into the high-throughput lab.

    By precision machining a calibrated slot in the tips of our pins, the range of delivery volumes can be greatly increased. Slot sizes vary from 10 nl to 500 nl depending on the diameter of the pin. The pins can be pre-treated with a permanently bonded hydrophobic/lipophobic coating to prevent non-specific binding to sample. Good results have been obtained with pin tools mounted on Tomtec, Packard, CyBio and Beckman robot systems.

  7. Patrick H.  Cleveland and Patricia J. Koutz.  (2002)  Nanoliter Transfers with Pin Tools, Advantages, Limitations and Solutions. Northeast Laboratory Robotics Interest Group Meeting, June 18, 2002

  8. James Follen.  (2003)  Pin Transfer of Compunds to Assay Plates, Harvard Medical School, Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology, Molecular Target Laboratory web site.
    (pdf)

  9. Patricia J. Koutz and Patrick H. Cleveland.  (2003)  High Throughput Nanoliter Transfers with Robotic Pin Tools, Laboratory Automation, Palm Springs, Presentation 2003.

  10. Joerg Dreessen, Joerg Gentsch and Niklaus Graber. (2004) Rapid Homogenization of Single Step Dilutions, in Minaturized 1,536 MTP Liquid Handling. Society for Biomolecular Screening September 11-15, 2004 Orlando Florida, Poster # P08011,  (Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Discovery Technologies / DTI, Basel, Switzerland) Poster awarded "Best Poster".  See movie of Poster
    (pdf)

  11. Peter Hodder, Rebecca Mull, Jason Cassaday, Kurtis Berry, Berta Strulovici (2004) Miniaturization of Intracellular Calcium Functional Assays to 1536 Well Plate Format using a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader.  Journal of Biomolecular Screening, Volume 9 Number 5, 417-426
    (pdf)

  12. Patrick H. Cleveland and Patricia J. Koutz. (2005) Nanoliter Dispensing for uHTS Using Pin Tools, ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies, Volume 3, Number 2, 213-225.
    (pdf)

    Abstract

    Miniaturization of assays is an important objective in Ultra-HTS. One of the major obstacles has been to find fluid handling systems capable of reliably and accurately delivering between 2 and 200 nl of test compound to assay plates. New methods of forming pins, placing slots in the pins, and hydrophobic coatings bonded onto the pins solve many of the problems encountered by early pin tools. Unlike other low-volume liquid handlers, these new pin tools provide the ability to transfer approximately 2 nl–5 ul of compounds. These pin tools can also use low-volume source plates (2–10 nl) and achieve an accuracy of better than 5%. This, coupled with the ability to transfer small volumes directly from the compound library to assay plates without an intervening dilution plate, saves reagents, throughput time, and consumables and is, therefore, very cost effective. Pin tool compound transfers in the 2–100 nl range provide a simple method to dilute away from the toxic effect that dimethyl sulfoxide has on some assay target cells. The factors that affect liquid transfers by pin tools are discussed in detail as well as the advantages and limitations of pin tools.

  13. Mitchell, Pete: The Automation Equation: Power tools take the stage for speed and efficiency. Pharma DD January/February 2007: Vol.
    2, No. 1:22-26.
     
  14. Yeast Functional Genomic Screens Lead to Identification of a Role for a Bacterial Effector in Innate Immunity Regulation Kramer RW, Slagowski NL, Eze NA, Giddings KS, Morrison MF, et al. PLoS Pathogens Vol. 3, No. 2, e21 doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.0030021
     
  15. Lauren M. Junker and Jon Clardy (2007) High-Throughput Screens for Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilm Development, Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacolog
    (pdf)

 

     
 


G. Deposition Of Enzyme For Anhydrous Storage In Microfluidic System

 
 
  1. Elena Garcia, Jared R. Kirkham, Anson V. Hatch, Kenneth R. Hawkins and Paul Yager, Controlled microfluidic reconstitution of functional protein from an anhydrous storage depot,  Lab on a Chip, 2004, 4(Advance Article)DOI: 10.1039/b308914b
    (pdf)
     


H. Picking Colonies

     
 
  1. Daniel G. Peterson, Jeffrey P. Tomkins, David A. Frisch, Rod A. Wing, and Andrew H. Paterson, CONSTRUCTION OF PLANT BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME (BAC) LIBRARIES: AN ILLUSTRATED GUIDE, Web article which references  in Chapter 2 the use of the VP 373 Colony Picker.
    (pdf)
     


I. Levitation Stirring (Mixing In Deep Well Plates)

     
 
  1. Qiagen's MicroR.E.A.L. Prep 384 Plasmid Kit Protocol.
    (pdf)

  2. Joanna S. Albala.  (2002) Protein expression microarrays for proteomics. Lab Automation 2002, Palm Springs Presentation, January 27.
    E-mail:albala1@llnl.gov.

  3. (pdf)

    Abstract

    The key advantage to array-based methods for protein study is the parallel analysis of thousands of samples in an automated, high-throughput fashion. In this "post-genomic" era, proteins and their study en masse, proteomics, is the next scientific frontier. Array-based methods are becoming prevalent within proteomics research due to the desire to analyze proteins using miniaturized formats. A strategy to produce 96-well protein microarrays has been developed using LLNL-I. M.A.G.E. (Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and Their Expression) cDNAs to generate recombinant protein libraries in a baculovirus-based paradigm. Protein arrays are produced in a microtiter, automatable format with which can be assayed using proteomic technologies for structure or function. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. K.A. Miller, D. Sawicka, D. Barsky, and J.S. Albala.  (2004)  Domain mapping of the Rad51 paralog protein complexes.  Nucleic Acids Research, 2004, Vol. 32, No. 1: p. 169-178.
    (pdf)
     

  5. (2001) Very high-throughput rapid extraction alkaline lysis minipreps of plasmid DNA.  microR.E.A.L. Prep 384 Plasmid Handbook.  June 2001.
    (pdf)

     
 


J. Tumble Stirring (Mixing In Microplates)

     
 


T
he ability to simultaneously stir the contents of 2,592 wells using 96 well microplates or 13,104 wells using 384 well microplates opens the possibility of miniaturizing many different processes from synthesis to micro-fermentations. These many new possibilities are discussed in articles published in the March 2, 1998 issue of "The Scientist" Volume 12 #5 page 13 and the March 1998 issue of American Laboratory News Edition, Volume 30 #7, page 10.

     
 
The following is the body of an e-mail sent to us by a very satisfied Tumble Stirring customer.

"Patty and Patrick-

There is a long, official process (read: involves Legal department) for allowing endorsements of products with _______'s and/or my name. However, I would be happy to share my personal feedback to you.  If you would like to refer this to anyone as unofficial information (ie, "It came from someone in Process R&D in major Pharma."), that would be great. At the least, you'll see exactly why I love these stirrers.

Feedback for the Tumble Stirrers is this: enabling technology. I am now enabled to create reaction blocks and customize them to robotic systems with great ease.  Why? The narrow deck height of the Tumble stirrers (even my larger strength units) combined with flexibility of alignment for the stirrers to the reaction vessels means I can use them almost anywhere.

The fact that I can use the same stirrer deck with any type/size of reactor simply by changing a mounting plate atop the stirrer deck gives me the kind of flexibility I require for parallel synthetic development of processes. That flexibility enables access to a wider range of projects (smaller scale) and a wider range of reaction conditions. I get more reactions per gram of starting material for evaluation of more diverse conditions, and I generate results faster because I run more of the experiments in parallel using the same amount of starting material. In one word, Tumble Stirring is enabling.

Oh, and the quality of agitation is fantastic for liquid-liquid mixes, slurries, or even oil suspensions.

Thanks again for this terrific product.

D____."
 

     
 
  1. Jung-Hwan Kwon and Beate I. Escher. (2007) A Modified Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay for Evaluating the Bioconcentration of Highly Hydrophobic Chemicals in Fish. Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    (pdf)
     
  2. Jung-Hwan Kwon,Thomas Wuethrich, Philipp Mayer, and Beate I. Escher. (2007). Dynamic Permeation Method To Determine Partition Coefficients of Highly Hydrophobic Chemicals between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Water. Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    (pdf)
     
  3. Jung-Hwan Kwon, Lynn E. Katz, and Howard M. Liljestrand (2006). Use Of A Parallel Artificial Membrane System To Evaluate Passive Absorption And Elimination In Small Fish. The University of Texas at Austin
    (pdf)
     
 


K. Bubble Paddle Stirring (Keeping Particulates In Suspension)

 
 
  1. Robert Ries, Helga Steiner, Michael Karnath, kAchim Lietz and Martin Valler. (2003) Optimisation of a customized robotic system for radioactive low volume assays.  MIPTEC, May, 2003 Basil, Switzerland.
    (pdf)
     
  2. Michael Harrold, Stephenie Pistacchi, and Gilbert Amparo. (2007) A New Purification Method for DNA Sequencing Reactions.  AGBT 2007. Applied Biosystems.
    (pdf)
     

L. Aspiration And Dispensing Manifolds
     
 
  1. BD Cytometric Bead Array deep well plate protocol,  Internet posting of protocol
    (pdf)

  2. BD Biosciences protocol for Cytokine Flow Cytometry of PBMC's in 96 well plates, Internet posting of protocol.
     
  3. Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology Molecular Target Laboratory.  (2003)Building a High Throughput Screening Facility in an Academic Setting.  Harvard Medical School.  http://iccb.med.harvard.edu/
    (pdf)
     

  4. B.R. Stockwell, S.J. Haggarty, and S.L. Schreiber.  (1999)  High-throughput screening of small molecules in miniaturized mammalian cell-based assays involving post-translational modifications.  Chemistry and Biology, 1999, p. 71-83.  http://biomednet.com/elecref/1074552100600071
    (pdf)
     

  5. U.S. Eggert, A.A. Kiger, C. Richter, Z.E. Perlman, N. Perrimon.  (2004) Parallel Chemical and Genome-Wide RNAi Screens Identify Cytokinesis Inhibitors and Targets.  PLoS Biol, 2(12): p. 279.
    (pdf)
     

  6. M.A. Suni, H.S. Dunn, P.L. Orr, R.D. Laat, E. Sinclair, S.A. Ghanekar, B.M. Bredt, J.F. Dunne, V.C. Maino, and H.T. Maecker.  (2003)  Performance of Plate-based Cytokine Flow Cytometry with Automated Data Analysishttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2172/4/9
    (pdf)
     

  7. Mary Lynn Baniecki, Dyann F. Wirth, and Jon Clardy. (2007) High-Throughput Plasmodium falciparum Growth Assay for Malaria
    Drug Discovery.  
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Feb. 2007, p. 716–723.
    (pdf)
     


M. Initiating PCR Reactions

     
 
  1. Pearlly S. Yan, Chuan-Mu Chen, Huidong Shi, Farahnaz Rahmatpanah, Susan H. Wei, Charles W. Caldwell and Tim Hui-Ming Huang.  (2001) Dissecting Complex Epigenetic Alterations in Breat Cancer Using CpG Island Microarrays.  Cancer Research 61, 8375-8380, December 1, 2001
    (pdf)
  2. Vicky Amann.  PCR Amplification Protocol for the NIA 15K set.  Vanderbilt Microarray Shared Resource
    (pdf)
     


N. Madge Gel Loading

     
 
  1. Tom R. Gaunt, Lesley J. Hinks, Hamid Rassoulian and Ian N.M. Day.  (2003) Manual 768 or 384 well microplate gel 'dry' electrophoresis for PCR checking and SNP genotyping.  Oxford University Press.  Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 9 e48
    (pdf)

     
 


O. Loading Arabidopsis Seeds For Genotype Analysis

     
 
  1. Patrick Krysan, (2004) Ice-Cap.  A High-Throughput Method for Capturing Plant Tissue Samples for Genotype Analysis.  Plant Physiology, July 2004, Vol 135, pp. 1162-1169.
    (pdf)
     
 


P. Wounding Tissue Culture Monolayers

     
 
  1. Justin C. Yarrow, Zachary E. Perlman, Nicholas J. Westwood and Timothy J. Mitchison. (2004) A high-throughput cell migration assay using scratch wound healing, a comparison of image-based readout methods. BMC Biotechnology 2004, 4:21 doi:10.1186/1472-6750-4/21
    (pdf)
  2. Eric A. Huebner‡, Byung G. Kim‡§, Philip J. Duffy‡, Rebecca H. Brown‡, and Stephen M. Strittmatter‡1 (2011). A Multi-domain Fragment of Nogo-A Protein Is a Potent Inhibitor of Cortical Axon Regeneration via Nogo Receptor 1. JBC VOL. 286, NO. 20, pp. 18026–18036
    (pdf)

  3. Laila Zai, Christina Ferrari, Carlie Dice, Sathish Subbaiah, Leif A. Havton, Giovanni Coppola, Daniel Geschwind, Nina Irwin, Eric Huebner, Stephen M. Strittmatter, and Larry I. Benowitz (2011). Inosine Augments the Effects of a Nogo Receptor Blocker and of Environmental Enrichment to Restore Skilled Forelimb Use after Stroke.
    J. Neurosci. 31(16):5977–5988
    (pdf)

     
         
 


Q. Forensic Applications

     
 
  1. Bob McLaren, Michael Bjerke and Allan Tereba. (2006) Automating the DNA IQ System on the Biomek® 3000 Laboratory Automation Workstation.
    (pdf)
     
 


R. Dispensing Solids /.Powders

     
 
  1. Taran Shilling, James Apgar, Nathan Ekborg, Gabor Lazar, Mary Ross, Binzhang Shen, Xueguang Sun, Humberto de la Vega, Xavier Zuo, and R. Michael Raab. (2010) Solid Substrate Based High Throughput Enzyme Assays for Directed Evolution of Cellulases and Xylanases.
    (pdf)
     
         

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